How YOU can support correct publish dates in Google’s SERP

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Issue #118
March 12th, 2019

Hey, lunch buddies.

I committed to 2019 being the year I really grow the #SEOForLunch newsletter. Part of making sure this newsletter is of the highest quality is reviewing other newsletters to identify areas where I could improve. With that said I want to share with you Kevin Indig’s Tech Bound newsletter.

Kevin’s newsletter covers the broader strokes of technical marketing which I felt was a really good compliment to the SEO focus of the #SEOForLunch. What I really liked was that Kevin regularly hosts high profile industry guests who contribute content for his readers to consume.

Take a look at his newsletter and let me know if guest writers are something you would want to see in a future issue of the #SEOForLunch.

Let’s get to this weeks news!


What You Need To Know

Article: Help Google know the best date to display in the SERP

What’s important?
Frustrated that Google doesn’t display publish dates on the content of your site? It might be as simple as Google not knowing what to display.  This post covers a few key components that Google relies on to ensure it can publish the correct date alongside your content within its search results.

Nick’s take:
It’s no surprise that content freshness is a factor in how/why Google displays its search results. We also know that publish dates can have an impact on click-through-rates as well. With all of this said its a no-brainer to make publish/edit dates as easy as possible for Google to see.


Identify any canonical value on any website URL  (FREE)

Interesting Reads in Your Spare Time

7 Tips for structured data for e-commerce sites – Distilled.net
Work in e-commerce? This should be a priority read for you.  Before this post, I wasn’t familiar with a free JSON editor to make sure your code is valid. Super valuable as structured data can be tricky at times. Great post, Tammy!

The complete guide to Screaming Frog custom extraction – UpRoer.com
I have a love-hate relationship with Screaming Frog when it comes to its custom extraction function.  I absolutely love it when I can get it to work properly but anyone who’s been stuck in writing the correct Regex/Xpath code can share in the pain of wanting to pull all of your hair out of your head.  Griffen and his team at UpRoer did a stellar job with this guide and I’m feeling good that I won’t be going bald anytime soon because of it.

How to use domain authority 2.0 (DA) for SEO – Moz.com
V2.0 of DA went live last week and it’s been met with mixed review. Despite being a third party metric, many SEOs confuse the score as a metric Google leverages in its ranking. They do not.  Cyrus goes back “home” to share with us how SEOs should really be leveraging the DA score within their SEO efforts.

How to turn unforgotten assets into new links – sharprocket.com.ph
Are you struggling to get buy-in for that new fancy linkable asset you want to be created? Keep up the good fight but also make sure you’re not sitting on a goldmine of opportunities with your “old” resources. Venchito’s post emphasizes just how important it is to not overlook quick wins when it comes to SEO — especially when it comes to acquiring inbound links.


Wrapping Up

Thanks for reading this week issue of #SEOForLunch.  If you have any questions or just want to say “HI!” feel free to hit “reply” and your email will go directly to my inbox. I respond to ALL emails.

If you want to follow Nick online:

Follow Nick on Twitter @NickLeRoy
Connect with Nick on LinkedIn (let me know you’re coming from the newsletter)

 

If you were forwarded this email you can sign up for the weekly email over at NickLeRoy.com

Nick LeRoy
Nick LeRoy
Nick has 10+ years of SEO experience building and executing strategies for clients ranging from multi-billion dollar consumer packaged goods to fashion entities with hundreds of physical store locations. He also writes the weekly SEO newsletter #SEOForLunch that allows you to stay up to date with industry updates in the amount of time it takes you to eat your lunch.